Latest posts by

Bruce Davie

Bruce Davie

Bruce Davie is CTO for Networking at VMware, and a Principal Engineer in the Networking and Security BU. He joined VMware as part of the Nicira acquisition, and focuses on network virtualization. He has over 25 years of networking industry experience, and was a Cisco Fellow prior to joining Nicira. At Cisco, he worked closely with leading service providers to enhance the capabilities of their networks. He led the team that developed multi-protocol label switching (MPLS) and contributed to the standards on IP quality of service. He has written over a dozen Internet RFCs and several networking textbooks. Bruce received his Ph. D. in computer science from the University of Edinburgh in 1988 and is an ACM Fellow.

Network Virtualization: Mainstream in 2015, Expanding Reach in 2016

Once again it’s time to look back on the last year, see what happened in our industry, and try to make some predictions for the coming year. Let’s start by seeing how last year’s predictions fared. One of my main points last year was that 2015 would be a year of operationalization and production deployment […]

NSX at VMworld 2015

I finished off 2014 with a round of predictions about the future of network virtualization, and now I find myself preparing my VMworld® 2015 session on a similar topic. So as a preview of what I’ll be talking about in a few days (and later on at VMworld Europe), I thought it would be worth looking […]

VMware NSX: What we learned in 2014; what to look for in 2015

Before I launch into some predictions for 2015, I want to take a quick look back at the post I wrote a year ago, predicting how the network virtualization landscape would shape up in 2014. This is not just to pat myself on the back for getting a few things right (my predictions weren’t that bold […]

Geneve, VXLAN, and Network Virtualization Encapsulations

For as long as we’ve been doing Network Virtualization, there has been debate about how best to encapsulate the data. As we pointed out in an earlier post, it’s entirely reasonable for multiple encapsulations (e.g. VXLAN and STT) to co-exist in a single network. With the recent publication of “Geneve”, a new proposed encapsulation co-authored […]

Network Virtualization in 2014

As 2013 comes to a close, it’s time to pull out the crystal ball and make some predictions about 2014—specifically, about what we’re likely to see in the Network Virtualization space in the coming year. The safest prediction I can make is that Network Virtualization will see a significant uptick in adoption next year. That’s […]

Network Virtualization Gets Physical

Network virtualization, as others have noted, is now well past the hype stage and in serious production deployments. One factor that has facilitated the adoption of network virtualization is the ease with which it can be incrementally deployed. In a typical data center, the necessary infrastructure is already in place. Servers are interconnected by a […]

Open Source, Open Interfaces, and Open Networking

[This post is a joint effort by Brad Hedlund, Scott Lowe, T. Sridhar, Martin Casado, and Bruce Davie] Without a doubt these are transformative times in networking. Everything we’ve known about how to build and operate networks over the last quarter century is changing: networks are evolving from interconnections of individually configured devices to software-defined, […]

VXLAN, STT, and looking beyond the wire format

[This post was written by Bruce Davie, Martin Casado and Brad Hedlund.] Some months ago, we wrote a post over on Network Heresy explaining the relationship between various tunneling protocols that are used in support of network virtualization. Because this issue of the encapsulation used for network virtualization seems to keep on causing confusion, we’re […]

Network Virtualization in the Software-Defined Data Center

This post co-authored by Bruce Davie, Martin Casado, and Brad Hedlund VMware has long been known as the company that changed computing by virtualizing servers. At Nicira, we set out to disrupt networking just as VMware disrupted computing, by virtualizing networks. The analogy between network virtualization and server virtualization can be a helpful one, but it […]